Example of elite talent with excellent technical skills: Martin Ødegaard (age 17) @Real Madrid

Lifelong player and student of the beautiful game in Germany, England, and USA. Volunteer futsal coach and USSF referee.

2 thoughts on “Example of elite talent with excellent technical skills: Martin Ødegaard (age 17) @Real Madrid

  1. Here’s what i saw, which is what most kids miss. Count the number of touches on each possession he has. It varies from 1 – 12. One time its 12, the next highest is 6 (a couple times) and the rest of the time its 1-3.

    In other words, even when he’s doing technically complex moves, as much (or more) of the move is body positioning, speed of movement and physically difficult body movement as it is actual ball on foot skill. In other words, in order to do these things he is using more skill to make athletic moves than he is to make difficult ball-on-foot moves.

    So, what “physical” training should we be doing with these kids, without the ball?
    Maybe:
    1. Core strength including hamstrings, glutes, quads, etc
    2. Functional fitness and strength – compound movements at speed, with quick directional changes while stimulating hand eye and ball eye coordination
    3. Balance, both static and dynamic
    4. Flexibility under muscle tension
    5. Fast movement, with quick changes in direction, in tight spaces
    6. Etc.

    In other words, to be a “great” soccer player you need far more than just actual “ball” skills. You need to be a master of your body’s ability to move in space, under pressure, at speed. While thinking tactically! 🙂

    How many clubs are training these aspects thoroughly, with or without the ball? Not many that i see…but i do see some individual specialist trainers doing it, and i wonder why the clubs are ding that too….

    Andrew

    Like

  2. Here’s what i saw, which is what most kids miss. Count the number of touches on each possession he has. It varies from 1 – 12. One time its 12, the next highest is 6 (a couple times) and the rest of the time its 1-3.

    In other words, even when he’s doing technically complex moves, as much (or more) of the move is body positioning, speed of movement and physically difficult body movement as it is actual ball on foot skill. In other words, in order to do these things he is using more skill to make athletic moves than he is to make difficult ball-on-foot moves.

    So, what “physical” training should we be doing with these kids, without the ball?
    Maybe:
    1. Core strength including hamstrings, glutes, quads, etc
    2. Functional fitness and strength – compound movements at speed, with quick directional changes while stimulating hand eye and ball eye coordination
    3. Balance, both static and dynamic
    4. Flexibility under muscle tension
    5. Fast movement, with quick changes in direction, in tight spaces
    6. Etc.

    In other words, to be a “great” soccer player you need far more than just actual “ball” skills. You need to be a master of your body’s ability to move in space, under pressure, at speed. While thinking tactically! 🙂

    How many clubs are training these aspects thoroughly, with or without the ball? Not many that i see…but i do see some individual specialist trainers doing it, and i wonder why the clubs are ding that too….

    Andrew

    Like

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